In 2014, Sony was forced to execute on the EOL of its widely successful CCD product line due to a raw material shortage. They could have simply passed on all associated cost and risks, but they decided to extend their EOL process by a full 10 years and aligned customers with a non-committal forecast. They didn’t have to do that.
This article will go through the evolution of this technology and explain some of the benefits of it. It will help your decision on how to transition your current CCD design to use a Sony Exmor CMOS sensor.
FRAMOS: From CCD to CMOS Sensors ► CMOS Technology reaches new Heights ✓ Read our latest Article ✓
People have recorded the world visually since the beginning of time. The eye is a proven tool for precisely this purpose, perfectly adapted to recognize surroundings in an extremely wide range of lighting conditions. Yet the eye is ill-suited to measuring absolute brightness values, which for example, is a necessary feature for test strips in medical diagnostics. A variety of technologies have thus been developed to relieve humans of this task and to automate it.
A personal CMOS tutorial by FRAMOS’ Darren Bessette: I was just as surprised as all of you were when I heard the news that Sony is discontinuing their CCD line of sensors. I have always been a big fan of their CCDs since the first time I saw the ICX205 sensor in 2003. And with the recent introduction of their EXview HAD II technology, I was even more excited and convinced that they were pioneering CCD technology to new levels. As a result of this news, I am seeing a lot more questions on Sony’s CMOS product line and how it can be used to replace some of the Sony CCD sensors that are already in use today.
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