Smart fridges, intelligent agricultural drones, or highly sensitive industrial robots - the working prototype and the first image present special challenges for developers embedding bare sensors into their devices. In this case, small sensor modules are ready for use and they can both simplify and accelerate the process from the initial concept, to a working prototype.
Explaining is one of Dr. Frederik Schönebeck's strengths. As Field Application Engineer (FAE) at FRAMOS, he helps customers to make optimum use of image processing and create "seeing" products. It is his job to always have an answer, to point out technical connections and to be the voice between hardware and software development. In his daily work, he helps companies from various industries in equipping their machines and devices with vision.
From small sensor modules to artificial intelligence - there are different technologies and image processing algorithms to allows drones to see. Each application has different requirements for the vision system and is dependent on the available space within the drone and the required image quality. Dr. Frederik Schönebeck of FRAMOS spoke at the VDI conference on "Civil Drones in Industrial Use" and described the criteria for applications in mapping, object recognition and navigation as well as the relevance of artificial intelligence for drones.
Drones are a popular and increasingly widespread product used by consumers as well as in a diversity of industrial, military and other applications. Historically fully under the control of human operators on the ground, they're becoming increasingly autonomous as the cameras built into them find use not only for capturing footage of the world around them but also in understanding and responding to their surroundings. Combining imaging with other sensing modalities can further bolster the robustness of this autonomy.
... former German chancellor Helmut Schmidt and fellow of the US Presidents Ford and Carter once said. Today "vision" is an essential component of the Smart Factory, robots, thinking machines, safety and autonomous home devices. The former chancellor would be delighted, that the doctor also opts for "vision" today. Modern medical treatments, such as the pain-free pill camera instead of a colonoscopy, are only made possible by the latest image-supported diagnostic and surgical systems.
The implementation of imaging and vision solutions can be a tough road to embark on. Expert guidance is always helpful to find the right path from technology to development, and from implementation to production. Sarah Wu of FRAMOS is such an expert who is devoting most of her time every day to helping customers devise solutions from a single image sensor all the way to entire embedded vision systems.
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